I have been writing about conversation starters on my other web site. And I realized that I haven’t written about the ULTIMATE question to ask if you want to persuade someone to do something (such as buy your products, hire you for a job, or go out on a date with you).

The question is the ultimate, because it comes out of the bible. I believe that God’s way of doing things is always the best method, which is why I have this web site about making money God’s way. So now you’re going to learn the ultimate question to ask a prospect to get them to listen to your sales presentation.

In the New Testament book of Acts, Philip uses this question as a conversation starter with a high-ranking Ethiopian eunuch, who was the Chief Financial Officer for his country.

Then Philip ran up to the chariot and heard the man reading Isaiah the prophet. “Do you understand what you are reading?” Philip asked. (Acts 8:30 NIV)

There it is, the ultimate persuasion question. It starts out as four simple words: “Do You Understand What… ?”

Go Ahead, Test This Question Out On The Next Person You Meet

Imagine a customer walks into your store, and she picks up a small trinket. You walk up to her and ask this question: “Do you understand what it is that you’re holding in your hands?”

Think about that question. What does it imply? This is rich, because there is so much power contained in this one simple question.

1. It elevates your status. You’re the one that knows the answer to the question. And for the prospect to get the information, they have to ask you. Whenever the prospect asks a question of you, that puts you in a position of authority.

2. The question implies that there is a secret about the item. It is almost like there is a mystery or magic about it. Don’t believe me? Say, for example, someone put the original Declaration of Independence in your hand, and you’ve never heard of it before. Then they asked you: “Do you know what you’re holding in your hand?” It is not just an ordinary piece of paper with some words written on it. That document contains magic, doesn’t it? People died for what was contained in the document.

3. The question builds value. Not only is there a secret, or some magic in the item, but now you believe that the item is more valuable.

4. The question implies power is transferred to the person holding it. Like a Aladdin’s Lamp, the item transfer’s its secret power to the person holding it. That makes them more important. You’ve probably heard people, after shaking hands with a famous person, say something like: “I’ll never wash my hand again.” Or, seeing a friend shake the hand of a famous person, you might say: “You lucky dog, you got to shake his hand.” They feel more powerful, just by holding it for a few seconds, and having someone else recognize the transference.

5. It forces a dialog between you and the prospect, which is initiated by the prospect. It is much better than asking them: “Do you need any help?” To which the common phrase is: “No thanks, I’m just looking.” With this question, they have to respond back to you.

Listen to what the Ethiopian says in the bible when asked this question:

How can I,” he said, “unless someone explains it to me?” So he invited Philip to come up and sit with him. Acts 8:31 (NIV)

In conclusion, there are only two possible answers to that question: yes or no – not: “no thanks, I’m just looking.”

If they say yes, they didn’t get the question. So follow it up with: “Do you REALLY understand what it is that you’re holding?” When you emphasize the word “really,” you have them in your hand.

So it doesn’t matter if you’re sharing the gospel with someone, or trying to get them to listen to your sales pitch, try out the ultimate persuasion question.

By the way, did you notice that I used it in the headline of this article? It made you read the whole thing, didn’t it?

For more tips on making money, please also visit my other web site: http://CustomerSecrets.com

Until next time, Be Fruitful.
.
.

Scripture taken from the HOLY BIBLE, NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION®. Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 Biblica. Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved.

 

Be Sociable, Share!